Officials are urging Brooklyn Bridge Park to keep its popular pop-up pool open while conducting a study of the feasibility of installing a permanent pool. The little pool is scheduled to close at the end of next summer. Photo by Mary Frost

Officials are urging Brooklyn Bridge Park to keep its popular pop-up pool open while conducting a study of the feasibility of installing a permanent pool. The little pool is scheduled to close at the end of next summer. Photo by Mary Frost

My, how time flies!

After a highly successful four-year run, the popular little Pop-Up Pool in Brooklyn Bridge Park is set to close at the end of next summer, after its fifth season.

Local officials are urging the park to keep it open, however, while it conducts a study of the feasibility of installing a permanent pool.

The pool, always intended to be temporary, was included in a Memorandum of Understanding agreed to by the city, state Sen. Daniel Squadron and Assemblymember Joan Millman in 2012. The pool’s construction cost $700,000, according to the Brooklyn Bridge Conservancy.

The 30-by-50-foot pool became an instant hit with thousands of park goers, who come from both the nearby neighborhood and from across the borough to enjoy a free swim. The area around the pool includes a 2,500-square-foot sandy beach, deck concessions, showers and restrooms.

Squadron and Councilmembers Brad Lander and Stephen Levin recently met with park officials to discuss keeping the pool open, and on Jan. 5 they wrote a joint letter to park President Regina Myer expressing concern about the planned closing.

“The pool has been a popular attraction since opening in 2012. It offers free entry and affordable swim lessons, which are a valuable resource — particularly for families who would not otherwise have access to this programming,” the officials wrote.

“Closing the pool would be a serious loss for communities around the borough,” they said. “As discussed in our meeting, we request the park conduct a feasibility study as the first step in pursuing a permanent pool. It is critical that the pop-up pool remains open while the study is completed and a path for a permanent pool in Brooklyn Bridge Park is established.”

Park spokesperson Belinda Cape told the Brooklyn Eagle via email on Tuesday, “As part of an August 2011 Memorandum of Understanding, the city committed to providing a ‘temporary pool in the Park for the duration of the summer season beginning in 2012 and continuing for the following four summers.’ Far from the ‘proposed elimination’ suggested in the January 5 letter, it was always understood that the ‘Pop-Up Pool’ would be temporary, and that BBP would then proceed with the original plans for more parkland at this site.”

She added, “As we head into the pool’s final summer as planned, we look forward to working with our elected officials to secure funds for a permanent swimming pool at Brooklyn Bridge Park.”

Comments are closed.

Post Navigation